Dani Olmo of RB Leipzig has joined the Common Goal charity movement. - © Markus Gilliar/GES/Pool/imago images
Dani Olmo of RB Leipzig has joined the Common Goal charity movement. - © Markus Gilliar/GES/Pool/imago images
bundesliga

Dani Olmo becomes first RB Leipzig player to join Common Goal

Dani Olmo has become the latest footballer, and the first from RB Leipzig, to join Common Goal and donate a proportion of his salary to charity.

The 22-year-old attacking midfielder has followed the likes of Borussia Dortmund's Mats Hummels, Bayern Munich's Serge Gnabry and his Leipzig coach Julian Nagelsmann in pledging a minimum of one percent of his salary to good causes, with 327 individuals now doing their bit.

"As professional footballers who earn our money playing football, we're not just in a privileged position, but we also have a huge chance to use our influence to contribute towards a tolerant, peaceful world," Olmo said prior to Leipzig's UEFA Champions League quarter-final clash with Atletico Madrid.

"Unfortunately, there are ethnic conflicts still raging in many places and these need to be resolved, so that people in the Balkans can live in with equal rights and in peace. I would like more than anything to make a difference in the Balkans in terms of children's rights and equal opportunities in education for growing children, regardless of their ethnic background or gender."

Olmo spent five and a half seasons with Dinamo Zagreb before moving to Leipzig. During those years, he was able to witness the enduring after effects of the Croatian War of Independence between 1991 and 1995, which is why he has promised to pass on some of his own wealth to help those in need.

The Common Goal movement provides funds to football non-governmental organisations across the globe, working on numerous projects in every continent.

“I’m 100% sure, 1000% sure that, once you have experienced it locally, no matter whether in Africa, Asia, or somewhere else, you think differently than when you hear from far away at home that there are problems or that help is needed," said Gnabry, who joined the initiative in October 2017.