Munich - Off the Ball, bundesliga.com's weekday feature, casts an eye over some of the offbeat and occasionally controversial tales to have emerged from Germany's top flight.

Today we look at some Bayer Leverkusen fans getting more than they bargained for with a goal celebration, plus Borussia Dortmund receiving a prize for laying out their beach towels...

Isn't it annoying when you're on holiday at the beach and you find all the deckchairs reserved with towels? Funnily enough, that is exactly what won Borussia Dortmund the Sports Marketing Award 2014 on Monday for their "From Dortmund with love" campaign during the UEFA Champions League final in London. Making fun of the stereotypical German tourist, Dortmund set up deckchairs in London's most visited sites such as Buckingham Palace and Trafalgar Square. Thankfully, London is not one of Europe's prime destinations for tanning, so the deckchairs were not in great demand anyway...

Having failed to hit the net in 409 minutes, Leverkusen's Stefan Kießling admitted he put himself "under too much pressure to score" again. After finding the target against VfB Stuttgart on Saturday, the striker ran to the home fans and revealed what helped him end his drought: his underwear. "I'd run out of lucky charms recently so my wife told me I should wear it," the frontman explained. Said undergarment was a gift recieved from one his fan clubs in 2010. Team-mate Heung Min Son, who sits next to him in the changing room said: "He should carry on scoring, but please Kies, wash it!"

For Leverkusen's first home game of 2014, club sponsor 'SalzburgerLand Tourismus GmbH' came up with something special for the fans. Massages, Austrian folk music, food and 'Nagelbalken' (a traditional game where you hammer a nail into a tree stump) were offered in the business and premium lounge at the stadium. An additional highlight for visitors was the snow sculpture of the starting XI outside the BayArena. Plenty of visitors enjoyed treats on offer, but unfortunately, the unseasonably warm temperatures meant the sculpture soon melted.